Tag Archives: course

CPD: staying motivated

By Hilary McGrath

Have you ever tried to study but found it hard to stay focused? Am I alone in formulating a great plan, then abandoning my learning when the initial enthusiasm has waned? Continuing Professional Development is important but staying motivated can be hard.

Building on the study of language has always been particularly important for me as a translator and proofreader. Being able to write well and to correct errors was not enough though – I wanted to be able to properly name the troublesome parts of the texts I was working on. A dangling modifier? An attributive adjective? A predicative phrase? I needed to study the function and structure of English grammar, so I considered my options.

Take a course

I considered taking an in-house course. Having a fixed date and a valid reason to take some time off work is an advantage. But the need to travel and pay for accommodation makes this an expensive choice.

Another option was an online course – an efficient way to learn, especially for those who live far from big cities. Distance learning usually means there are start and end dates, deadlines and a certificate to show you have put in the work. The CIEP offers a Brush Up Your Grammar course, for example.

But I had to take cost into account. Unfortunately, I’d already dipped into my CPD budget, having recently attended a one-day workshop and completed an online course. How about self-study, then?

Buy a book

Buying a book and working through it slowly but surely was the next obvious thing to do. But, before I could even choose a book to buy, I knew my main problem would be staying motivated. How could I be sure I would stick with my learning plan?

Find a buddy (or several)

I made the fortunate discovery, through the CIEP forums, that other editors and proofreaders had the same idea as me. Together we selected a book – Grammar: A student’s guide by James R Hurford. Then, Slack was suggested as a communication tool for collaborative study. It was free, easy to join and very intuitive to use. It would become our virtual classroom.

Set some SMART goals

  • Specific – we chose a textbook that had exercises at the end of every section and answers to check at the end of the book.
  • Measurable – we studied the agreed section during the week, completed the exercises, checked the answers and discussed any difficulties or revelations once a week.
  • Attainable – the chosen textbook started with the basics but provided fuel for further discussion.
  • Relevant – as professionals working with language, building on our knowledge of English grammar was useful and important.
  • Time-bound – we would work through the book, literally from A to Z, on a weekly basis over a few months.

How did it work out?

As motivation was my key concern prior to starting, I was pleased that I was always able to find the time to join the weekly meetings. If I had been working on my own, I might have been less diligent. The whole exercise gave me a solid foundation in grammar and the desire to continue building on this in the future.

An unexpected outcome

This was a great way to get to know colleagues better. The group was small enough so that we could chat comfortably, but large enough to keep moving forward if one person couldn’t attend. There were so many advantages to working together like this – the most unexpected one was that the learning experience was so enjoyable.

Working alone but together

I found that this kind of learning suits me. I could work at my own pace during the week but use the regular meetings to keep on track. It was nice to know that I was not alone when I found something particularly hard to understand. And Slack was ideal for our purposes, giving us a dedicated space to work together.

What’s next?

For me, a combination of taught courses and self-study is perfect. But self-study is easier if you can find people with similar goals, whether in your personal life or through your professional networks. Then all you need is a book and a plan. Would I do this again? Absolutely! Anyone interested in joining me?

Hilary McGrath is a freelance proofreader and translator (French–English) living in the southwest of France. Find her on Twitter @hilary_mcgrath.

 

 


Photo credit: opened book by Aaron Burden on Unsplash

Proofread by Victoria Hunt, Intermediate Member.
Posted by Abi Saffrey, CIEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the CIEP.

Face-to-face CPD in 2020

CPD is a critical part of every editor and proofreader’s year. There is now a vast array of online courses available, but there really is nothing like being in a room, talking with and learning from peers and experts. Here are some possible face-to-face CPD (and networking) events that you could invest in in 2020.

Conferences

SfEP CIEP 2020

The SfEP conference has been a mainstay of many editors’ calendars for years – this year will be the first ever Chartered Institute of Editing and Proofreading conference, which is bound to be packed full of informative and challenging sessions and learning opportunities, just like the 30 SfEP conferences that preceded it. Booking will open in March.

www.sfep.org.uk/networking/conferences/
Dates: 12–14 September 2020
Location: Kents Hill Park, Milton Keynes

ACES 2020

The 24th annual national conference of ACES, the Society for Editing, has sessions on developing a quality editorial process, the gift of imperfection, editing memoir, diverse content, thinking like a linguist, and editor health and self-care (including a mile-long #StetWalk!). Registration is open now, and spaces are filling up.

https://aceseditors.org/conference/2020
Dates: 30 April–2 May 2020
Location: Hilton Salt Lake City Center Hotel, Salt Lake City, UT

EDITORS20 / RÉVISEURS20 / CORRECTORES20

Editors Canada hosts the International Editors Conference this year, which offers three days of seminars, workshops and keynotes on the theme of ‘From Papyrus to Pixels: International Editing Trends’. Registration is open now, with earlybird rates in place until April.

www.editors.ca/professional-development/conference/international-editors-conference-2020
Dates: 19–21 June 2020
Location: Le Centre Sheraton Montreal, Montreal, QC

METM20

The Mediterranean Editors and Translators Meeting (METM) offers three days of presentations and keynote speeches, workshops and ‘Off-METM’ events for editors, translators, interpreters and other providers of English-language support services, this year on the theme of ‘The Style Issue’. Registration begins in late spring, and is open to members a week ahead of everyone else.

www.metmeetings.org/en/presentation:1265
Dates: 15–17 October 2020
Location: Olarain University Hall of Residence, Donostia/San Sebastián, Spain

IPEd Conference 2021

Okay, yes, this one isn’t until 2021 (as IPEd holds its conference every two years), but if you don’t live in Australia, you’re going to need that extra bit of time to save your pennies! The theme is ‘Editing on the Edges’, inspired by Hobart’s geographic location and the fact that editors are always dealing with edges, whether they be geographic, demographic, technological or ethical.

https://iped2021.org.au/
Dates: 28–30 June 2021
Location: Hobart Grand Chancellor, Hobart, TAS

Book fairs

London Book Fair

This year’s London Book Fair has over 200 sessions planned covering 11 dedicated seminar streams, including Authors: Central to our Business, and People Development: Re-skilling our Industry. Hundreds of publishers – and of course the CIEP – will be in the exhibitors hall. Tickets available now.

www.londonbookfair.co.uk/
Dates: 10–12 March 2020
Location: Olympia London, Kensington, London

Frankfurter Buchmesse

2019’s Frankfurt Book Fair was the biggest ever with nearly 7,500 exhibitors – we’ve got to assume that 2020’s fair is going to be larger yet. There isn’t much information about the 2020 event available at the time of writing, but it looks like a great place ‘to exchange ideas, be inspired, try out new technologies and cultivate contacts’. Tickets on sale from April (private visitors) and June (trade visitors).

www.buchmesse.de/en
Dates: 14–18 October 2020
Location: Messegelände, Frankfurt am Main

Workshops and courses

In the UK, the SfEP continues to offer its Introductions to Proofreading and Copyediting as one-day workshops, and usually hosts a different one-day workshop on the day before its conference starts. Local SfEP groups can work together with the SfEP office to organise workshops on other topics. The Society also offers bespoke in-house courses for companies and organisations.

The Publishing Training Centre has 21 classroom-based courses in its schedule for 2020, covering core publishing skills, project planning and management , strategy and list building, professional development and marketing.

SfEP local groups

And no summary of face-to-face CPD would be complete without a mention of the SfEP’s local groups – meetings offer a great way to share knowledge and experience (and often also tasty food and beverages).


Photo credits – all SfEP, taken at the 2019 SfEP annual conference.

Proofread by Victoria Hunt, Intermediate Member.
Compiled and posted by Abi Saffrey, SfEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.

How I got started – Abi Saffrey

SfEP logoOne of the most common questions asked at Society for Editors and Proofreaders (SfEP) local groups and by those interested in pursuing a career in editing or proofreading is: ‘How did you get started?’.

SfEP professional member Abi Saffrey shares her story in this regular blog feature, which explores the many different career paths taken by SfEP members.

I’m not an unlikely editor: I’ve always had a passion and aptitude for language, adore the feel and smell of a book, and love to organise.

Achievements in French and English at school led to a degree in Languages and Linguistics. As a new graduate, I got an admin job at Dillons the Bookstore, which in many ways was heaven: organising money and paperwork for 30 per cent of my day; unpacking and sorting books for the other 70 per cent.

I left that job for a better-paid admin job elsewhere, but the books kept calling so I applied for graduate editing jobs, and I was offered an editorial assistant job with a small business-to-business publisher. The process wasn’t a standard book publishing one, and we certainly didn’t use BSI marks, but I learnt about various types of content quality control and enjoyed editing colleagues’ writing.

After taking a ‘career break’ (i.e. three months travelling the world), I landed a desk editor job at Continuum in London. I was thrown into the deep end, managing books from manuscript submission to final proofs.

I then went to a large US corporation’s UK office to edit the work of ten in-house economic analysts, and that’s where my subject specialism started to develop. I studied for an ‘A’ level in Economics, read the Economist every week, and attended seminars on shipping routes and trade terms. I managed a monthly publication (with contributions from 15 economists), and edited reports that were revised annually. I became responsible for improving the economists’ writing skills – they came from all over the globe, so I learnt a lot about the challenges that non-native English speakers face when trying to express complicated concepts in their second (third, fourth) language.

From there, I headed to Glasgow to work as a publishing project manager for an education quango. The production processes were very paper-based, so I introduced an electronic workflow and encouraged the use of freelances to lessen the load on in-house staff. My role developed into quality control manager, so by the time I left I was responsible for ensuring a 60,000-page website (and around 100 printed publications every year) met specific quality standards.

I was moving further and further away from the words I love, so in January 2009 I stepped off the precipice and joined the freelance community. I had joined the SfEP Glasgow group in 2007 and received advice, support and encouragement, and I had already done a couple of freelance projects alongside my full-time job, so I felt informed about, and prepared for, my leap.

I sent a lot of emails, and my first few jobs were for previous employers. In that first year a conversation with a friend (a university lecturer) evolved into working with a journalist to create a database of English writing examples and questions, to help university students (both native and non-native English speakers) improve their writing skills.

I kept emailing potential clients, and by the end of my first year I had worked with 11 different organisations (four of which I still work with). The variety is key for me: last year, I did a five-month stint editing an economics journal (with its editorial board based in Hamburg); this year, I’m attending the PTC’s Editorial Project Management course, in preparation for offering another service to my clients.

I’m always on the lookout for new opportunities – I carry a notebook with me so I can jot down the names of organisations I would like to work with. Then, every few months, I do a bit of online research and approach those organisations. On my current list are publishers included in the reference list of an article I’ve edited, a think-tank that featured in a TV documentary, and a research institute that someone mentioned at a birthday party.

Abi SaffreyAbi Saffrey is a professional member of the SfEP. She specialises in copy-editing and proofreading economics and social policy content, and anything within the wider social sciences realm. Abi is a social introvert with two young children, and slight addictions to bootcamps and tea.

Proofread by SfEP entry-level member Susan Walton.

The views expressed here do not necessarily represent those of the SfEP.