Category Archives: Awards

Print Futures Awards

By Lauren Campbell

In early 2017, purely by chance, I stumbled across something called the ‘Print Futures Awards’. Little did I know that applying for the award was one of the best decisions I’ve made in my career so far, starting a journey that led me to the Chartered Institute of Editing and Proofreading.

The Printing Charity

The Print Futures Awards are held by the Printing Charity, an organisation that supports those working in the printing, publishing, packaging and graphic arts sectors. I wasn’t familiar with the Charity when I first discovered the Awards, but the more I read about them the more I was blown away by their work, from their dedicated sheltered homes that offer the opportunity for people from the print sectors to stay independent in retirement, to the plethora of training initiatives that they offer for rising talent in the industry.

The Printing Charity has a rich and fascinating history: founded in 1827 by an independent printer in London, Queen Victoria granted the organisation a Royal Charter in 1865 and every monarch since has been the Charity’s patron. The list of the Printing Charity’s presidents reads like a who’s who of literary and political figureheads, including Charles Dickens among many others!

The Awards

The Printing Charity started the Print Futures Awards scheme in 2003. The Awards offer a grant of up to £1,500 to help those aged 18 to 30 to develop their skills and progress in their print-related careers, and are now the largest single awards programme in the UK printing, paper, packaging, publishing and graphic arts sector.

In 2017, there were 275 applications, and I felt extremely privileged to be one of the 78 winners. During the last round of applications in summer 2019 there were a record 93 winners, proving that the Print Futures Awards are going from strength to strength, and the support that they are providing to rising talent in the industry is crucial.

What really struck me, reading through the brochure of the winners afterwards, was the wide range of applicant backgrounds and the many possibilities of what the award could be used for. Winners came from the length and breadth of the UK, and planned to use the award for career-building aspects such as work experience, postgraduate degrees, specialist equipment and investment into projects like blogs, magazines, artist project spaces and illustrated books.

Applying for the Print Futures Awards

At the time, I’d recently completed the Basic Proofreading qualification from the Publishing Training Centre, and I was looking for ways to further my experience and gain more skills. Having seen the award advertised on social media, I quickly started on my application form, which asked applicants to provide a short paragraph stating how the award would help them. I had so many ideas of what I wanted to do – the hard part was fitting it all into just 300 words!

I was delighted to receive an email saying I was through to the next stage. My delight quickly turned into sheer terror upon finding out the next stage was an interview with industry professionals. I consider myself eloquent enough through the medium of the written word, but unfortunately in person and on the spot that can often be quite the opposite …

To try to combat this, I decided to do as much research as humanly possible. I came up with an extremely comprehensive ‘career plan’: a three-page (A3-size!) business plan that set out every little detail as to how I planned to use the bursary provided by the Print Futures Award. My first priority was to continue my education with the Publishing Training Centre by completing the Basic Editing course, the next stage up from Basic Proofreading. My second priority was to join the Society for Editors and Proofreaders (as it was then) to expand my knowledge of the industry and hopefully meet some lovely fellow editors and proofreaders who could help me on my journey! I went through the comprehensive list of courses available from both the SfEP and the PTC and decided on the right ones for me, adding them to the business plan to meet the potential total of £1,500.

The interviews were held in the stunning St Bride Foundation in London, a print heritage centre and library just off Fleet Street. Fortunately, my anxiety about the interviews was entirely unnecessary. From the outset, my lovely panellists assured me that this was as friendly as an interview could be. We discussed my current role and the training I had done so far, and my aspirations for the future – out came the beautifully printed business plan, and (thankfully) they were thrilled. Apparently I was the first person out of all their interviews so far to produce such an in-depth plan, and it was extremely useful for them in terms of being able to see how committed I was to my career plans and exactly how I’d spend every penny of the award. I left the interview feeling like I’d had a lovely chat – definitely not what I had expected on going in!

Shortly afterwards the Printing Charity informed me that I had been successful in achieving a Print Futures Award, and I was invited to the Print Futures Awards Event at the House of Lords. The evening itself was a spectacular experience: drinks and canapes on a terrace in the House of Lords overlooking the River Thames, meeting and talking to my fellow winners and networking with the big names of the print and publishing industries, and a wonderful feeling that this was the start of my perfect career!

What I have gained from my award

My initial business plan spanned all the way from 2017 to 2020, so it’s been interesting to look back at my predictions and compare them with what I have achieved so far. I have achieved my two main priorities, having been a member of the SfEP/CIEP since 2017 and completing the Basic Editing course in 2018. Both of these have opened doors that I never imagined previously, from attending the wonderful North East SfEP mini-conference last year and meeting those in my local SfEP group, to having the skills and confidence to complete some freelance proofreading and copyediting. The Printing Charity also has an Alumni group, which has been a brilliant resource of contacts and further opportunities, for example training in the Adobe Creative Suite through a series of webinars.

My next goal is to upgrade my CIEP membership to Intermediate, to get a coveted place on the IM Available list. To help with this and to continue my CPD I’m looking to undertake a CIEP training course, and I’m very excited to get back to my favourite past-time of learning new skills!

I can’t thank the Printing Charity enough for giving me the opportunity to progress my career, and I also can’t be more complimentary about the wonderful members of the CIEP for making me feel welcomed and providing guidance and knowledge. I would recommend the Print Futures Awards without hesitation for anyone aged 18–30 wanting to further themselves in any print-related career.

Here’s to many more fruitful years in the CIEP!

Lauren Campbell is a Communications Assistant for a multi-academy trust in Northumberland, and is starting her journey as a freelance proofreader and copyeditor. She is an Entry-Level Member of the CIEP and can be found on Twitter. She has covered a wide range of topics in her editing work, her favourite so far being copy for tabletop role-playing games such as Dungeons and Dragons.

 


Applications are now open for the 2020 Print Futures Awards.

All new CIEP members receive a £25 training voucher from the Dorothy Mitchell Smith Memorial Fund, which can be put towards the cost of one CIEP course.


Photo credits: Print Futures Awards invitation – Lauren Campbell; Print Futures Awards 2017 winners – property of The Printing Charity, taken by Ray Schram.

Proofread by Victoria Hunt, Intermediate Member.
Posted by Abi Saffrey, CIEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the CIEP.

Judith Butcher Award shortlist

Some readers might remember Helen Stevens’s fine April post about the Judith Butcher Award. It is presented to someone who makes or has made a ‘clearly identifiable and valuable difference’ to the SfEP. Each year all Society members are asked to nominate candidates for the Award, saying why they think their nominee should be considered.

Quite a few members sent in nominations this year and the committee has weighed and sifted the excellent claims of the eight members nominated. They’ve winnowed the list down to three. Now we have to wait until the Conference gala dinner on 17 September to find out who has won.

The candidates on the shortlist are Lesley Ellen, Louise Harnby and Gerard Hill.

 

Lesley Ellen

Lesley Ellen

Lesley Ellen has been nominated, partly for organising the successful 2017 mini-conference in Scotland, partly for being ‘the driving force behind the Edinburgh local group’, which she helped revive after an earlier Scottish mini-conference in 2014, and partly for setting up the Edinburgh Editors’ Network. Nominators describe her as ‘being so supportive and encouraging to new members in the Edinburgh area’, and as ‘an exemplar of SfEP membership’. ‘She has helped me several times with editing-related queries,’ writes another nominator, and yet another says Lesley ‘constantly promotes the group through Twitter and forum activity’.

 

Louise Harnby

Louise Harnby

I’m sure I don’t need to remind readers of Louise Harnby’s blog ‘The Proofreader’s Parlour’ or ‘her ongoing support of all proofreaders and editors, through her free provision of PDF stamps, the vast array of resources available freely on her website and also … her books’. These ‘are the most visible of many efforts on behalf of members, as are her always thoughtful, thorough and polite posts on SfEP forums’. She sets ‘a great example by showing us how best to market an editorial business’.

 

Gerard Hill

Gerard Hill

Gerard Hill has ‘been a huge and positive presence … endlessly enthusiastic, approachable and supportive’. Members who have successfully completed the Society’s mentoring programme already have an immense debt of gratitude to Gerard, and having put in the maximum permitted eight years on the council, he has retired … to become the Society’s chartership adviser. This promises to make an enormous contribution to both the members of the SfEP and the wider editing community.

 

Lest we forget, to encourage members to send in nominations (it’s important! The Award can only be given to people put forward by the membership) the Society offered a £30 book token to the member sending in the first nomination drawn out of a hat. (Actually, it was a pile of scraps of paper drawn out of a mug.) The lucky winner was Sarah Campbell: thanks for taking the trouble, Sarah, and I hope you enjoyed the book(s).

The committee has put forward these three candidates. Now one of them will be given the honour of receiving the Judith Butcher Award at the conference gala dinner in Wyboston Lakes, Bedfordshire.

I’ll see you there, I hope!

Cocktails, superheroes and pick ’n’ mix: SfEP at the UK Blog Awards 2017

‘We are delighted to advise that your content has reached the final stage in the UK Blog Awards process as a company finalist…’

Earlier this year I was thrilled to learn that the SfEP had made the final for the 2017 UK Blog Awards. Over 2,000 blogs had been nominated this year, and the SfEP received sufficient votes to reach the final eight in the Arts and Culture category, alongside blogs by Royal Mint, English Heritage and Bodleian Libraries. As the SfEP blog relies on the support of volunteer writers, I was delighted that their contributions had been recognised and appreciated.

Finalists are invited to attend a glitzy awards ceremony in London, and I was delighted to represent the SfEP with social media volunteer Anna Nolan. Here are our recollections of the night…

Tracey

Confession: I have never been to an awards ceremony before, and I wasn’t sure what to expect. Reading through the #UKBA17 tag on Twitter, I learned the ceremony was sponsored by Odeon cinemas and would have a superhero theme, which only added to my curiosity!

On arrival at the Park Plaza, we joined the other attendees for nibbles and drinks. While searching for a waiter serving what looked like crispy fries (sadly, we were too late and they had all gone), we decided to participate in some of the movie-themed attractions on offer. We were transformed into Wonder Woman – including gauntlets and lightning – courtesy of Warner Bros. (apparently, I was too ‘smiley’ and didn’t snarl appropriately). The SfEP was also judged unworthy and we were unable to pull Excalibur from the stone.

When the ceremony started, the first category announced was Arts and Culture, in which the SfEP was a company finalist. Sadly, the SfEP didn’t win, and English Heritage was awarded the prize for this category. But our disappointment was short-lived (for me anyway!) as bags of free pick ’n’ mix were handed out during the break and we got to chat to other finalists, including the lovely blog team from Cancer Research UK.

The event ended with the award for best overall blogs (congratulations to Sortedfood and Bella Coco), yummy macaroons and more drinking. Tired, but happy, we headed back to the hotel to drink more of Anna’s delicious cocktail and inspect the goodie bags given to finalists. Our bags included books, phone cases, superhero lollipops, a fluffy rubber duck and a music festival survival pack. We chatted about the SfEP and other critical issues (who is better looking: Tom Hiddleston or Benedict Cumberbatch?), and agreed it had been a fabulous evening.

Anna

Tracey and I had been in touch a few times leading up to the event, so had booked into the same hotel. The tickets stated quite clearly, dress code: formal. Yikes! Unlike most women I know, I hate dressing up. I’m thinking it might be a common thing among editors, as working from home means we barely get out of pyjamas or tracky pants or … wait … maybe that’s just me.

We met for a pre-event cocktail in my room, discovering our mutual loathing of dressing up. Tracey recalled some of the outrageous and completely inappropriate tweets from people hashtagging the blog awards and so we prepared ourselves for a ‘young’ crowd (not that we’re not).

After a long 15-more-like-20-minute walk to the venue (yeah, thanks, Google Maps!), we took the lift to level–3 (no, not a car park) and stumbled into … a nightclub. Well, that’s what it felt like. Dimmed lights, sparkling dresses, free-flowing drinks, pumping music and a buzzy atmosphere. We didn’t arrive unfashionably early so we missed out on some of the more enticing nibbles, but lukewarm pizza sufficed. That, and a glass of Prosecco.

Odeon was the main sponsor for the evening, and photo opportunities as Wonder Woman and with Excalibur were not to be missed out on. It felt very red carpet and our timing was such that we only just managed to partake in all the fun before being ushered into the awards.

The SfEP blog was a finalist in the company category for Arts & Culture. Proceedings were swift and well rehearsed and as the alphabet would have it, Arts & Culture was first up! The company prize went to the English Heritage blog – and well deserved, indeed. They did so well, in fact, that one category wasn’t enough! They also won the Travel category and were runner-up in an Overall Content category (or something like that!). We had a good laugh at some of the blog names – see Not Dressed As Lamb and Muddy Stilettos (so much for our hatred of dressing up!).

We couldn’t possibly resist the pick ’n’ mix during the break (don’t think I’ve ever eaten so much sugar in one go!), nor the dainty cream-filled macaroons at the close of the event, but we did manage to avoid being the first on the dance floor! What a fun night!

Anna Nolan is a paediatric dietician who started her editing career in 2013, when she joined SfEP. She’s a strong advocate for SfEP, currently active on the SfEP social media team and setting up the Herts & Essex SfEP local group in January 2017.

Tracey Roberts currently works as editorial assistant for the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group based in Nottingham and is the SfEP blog coordinator.

Five reasons I’m a fan of the Judith Butcher Award

Nominations are now being sought for this year’s Judith Butcher Award (JBA), but what’s it all about? OK – cards on the table: I was the proud recipient of the JBA in 2013 for my work on social media. Perhaps that means I’m slightly biased. But it also means that I can give you a very personal take on this annual celebration of exceptional contributions to the community that is the SfEP.

Official recognition

I was proud to have my efforts officially recognised, epecially as it meant that my name would appear in the same sentence as Judith Butcher’s!

I joined the SfEP in 1997, but it was only when I became a marketing and PR volunteer in 2009 that I really started to appreciate just how much valuable work goes on behind the scenes, and how much the Society’s volunteers contribute to the running of the organisation. When I became a director in 2010, I relied on the help of such individuals, particularly when our social media activities started to expand and we needed a team of people to keep the show running.

The fact that I’d seen how much work went on behind the SfEP scenes made me all the more pleased to have this official recognition.

Nominated by peers

One aspect of the award that makes it very special is that nominations come from one’s colleagues within the Society.

Although many of the people who are involved in running the SfEP do so out of sight of most of their fellow members, I’m sure we can all think of individuals who’ve contributed, perhaps on the forums, on a particular project, in our local group or in a more public sphere.

I can tell you that having one’s efforts noticed and appreciated by colleagues is a very lovely feeling indeed, and I’d encourage everyone to think hard to see if they can call to mind someone who’s impressed them and ought to be recognised.

Social media

In the past, not all members saw the value in the SfEP being involved in social media, so I was really pleased that my JBA was awarded ‘for significantly raising the national and international profile of the SfEP, and the work of editors and proofreaders in general’ through my voluntary work on social media.

I believe social media has played a significant role in promoting the SfEP, and it was heartening that the JBA recognised this.

Team effort

When I was awarded the JBA, I felt that it was a reflection of the efforts of all those who had contributed behind the scenes to these activities. Although I couldn’t share the award with all those who had helped, it did make me appreciate their support, dedication and commitment. I really couldn’t have done it without them.

Book token

And now I have a confession to make: for many years I didn’t actually have my own copy of Butcher’s Copy-editing. I know, right? So when I won the JBA I decided to use the book token prize to buy myself a copy. It just seemed like the right thing to do (and it is an invaluable resource).

So please do get your thinking cap on and consider nominating someone who has:

  • made a clearly identifiable and valuable difference to the way the SfEP is run, and/or
  • carried through a specific project that has been of particular value to the SfEP and/or its members.

See the full rules here, but note that this year the timetable will differ from the one described on our website. Please email nominations to jba@sfep.org.uk by 12 noon on Friday 5 May 2017.

 

Helen Stevens has been a freelance proofreader, editor and copywriter for over 20 years, and now specialises in academic and non-fiction editing. She enjoys playing Scrabble and walking, though not at the same time. Saltaire Editorial Services

 

 

 

Posted by Tracey Roberts, SfEP blog coordinator

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP

Judith Butcher Award shortlist 2015

The SfEP has issued a shortlist of members to be considered by this year’s sub-committee in charge of the Judith Butcher Award. It is presented to someone who makes or has made a ‘clearly identifiable and valuable difference’ to the SfEP.

Each year, all Society members are asked to nominate candidates for the Award, saying why they think the nominee should be considered, and the sub-committee draws up a shortlist. This is then studied carefully, and the winner decided upon.

The presentation itself takes place at the conference gala dinner on 6 September.

Three candidates are on the shortlist: Paul Beverley, Rod Cuff and Louise Harnby.

PBPaul Beverley

Paul is described as giving ‘unstintingly of his time and expertise, sharing freely what could be considered commercially valuable expertise (which he could easily have sold in ebook format instead)’, and as ‘helpful to me and countless others simply by responding to queries about, or requests to write, macros’. Another nominator writes that Paul ‘contributes a great deal to the continuing professional development of the SfEP membership’.

RCRod Cuff

In many years on the general committee (precursor of the current council), developing and looking after matters electronic, Rod ‘has been a driving force within the SfEP … developing and maintaining the website and the online Directory, and running SfEPLine’, managing the Directory until 2012 and somehow able to fit in being the official proofreader for Editing Matters for the last 12 years. In addition, he ‘has used his long experience of SfEP’s past by working voluntarily in the Membership Working Group and the Futures Group … to lead the many hours of research, thinking and work that led to the new membership arrangements now in place’. Another role is as a key member of the Linnets – the choir that performs at the annual conference – and he also ‘flew the flag for editors on Only Connect’.

LHLouise Harnby

Louise is described by one nominator as ‘a constant source of inspiration … [she] has helped no end of newer members of the Society’. The set of PDF proofreading stamps that she provides free to members of the Society, the books she has published on setting up as an editor and on marketing editorial services, and her inspirational blog are the most visible of many efforts on behalf of members, including what have been described as ‘always thoughtful, thorough and polite … posts on SfEP forums’.

A longer version of this article originally appeared in the July/August edition of Editing Matters, the membership magazine of the Society for Editors and Proofreaders.