Tag Archives: social media

CIEP social media round-up: April and May 2021

From spoof biographies to snacks, annual reports to fact sheets, conferences to quizzes, April and May 2021 combined fun, advice and endless opportunities to get engaged online. In this round-up, we cover:

  • Special days
  • Improving your business and working practices
  • Sharing CIEP resources
  • Conference excitement
  • Wordy chat
  • Quizzes and other fun stuff

Special days

Immediately as April started there was a special day to celebrate – April Fool’s Day. We posted an article about Grove Music Online’s Spoof Article Contest, which has been running now for 20 years. You can read the winning entry, plus the runners up, in the article. The judges commented: ‘It was hard to miss that the biographies took a turn for the macabre, perhaps inevitable as we begin year two of a pandemic. Whereas our 2016 contest saw a surprising number of flatulence artists among its biographees, this year we saw an unprecedented attention to the mode of death.’ What future world events may cause a resurgence in spoof flatulence-artist biographies, we wonder?

On 16 April we noted, in our pyjamas, that it was ‘Wear your pajamas to work day’, and on 26 April we were organised enough to note that it was ‘Get organized day’. Oh goodie! An opportunity to buy yet another notebook.

We celebrated the Oscars in late April by sharing a list of the books behind the nominated films and discovering what’s behind the term ‘red carpet’.

Improving your practice

Sharing advice and tips is a big part of what we do. Two of the articles we posted to help our followers improve their practice were written by CIEP members, and one of them is worth keeping in mind as you trawl through the many articles offering principles for a successful start-up or listing must-dos as a beginner. CIEP Advanced Professional Member Helen Stevens’s Take my advice – but also don’t lists ten pieces of advice where the opposite might also well be true. We continued this advice/anti-advice theme with two other curated articles: ‘Why procrastination can help fuel creativity’, which looked at the role of the unconscious mind in invention, and ‘The benefits of distraction’, based on a review of a session at the ACES 2021 conference, held in April.

One piece of advice that is unequivocally worth taking, however, especially as your freelance business grows, is CIEP Advanced Professional Member Hazel Bird’s suggestion to produce an annual report. This will give you a regular chance to assess where you’ve come from and where you’re going. ‘Use yours as a pathway to shed the aspects of your business that pull you down and achieve more of what you want’, she says.

Keeping up to date with technology is essential to running a successful editorial business so we took notice when Jane Friedman helpfully revealed how to turn a Microsoft Word document into an Ebook, and Crystal Shelley usefully reviewed Word Macros, giving our own Paul Beverley a mention.

Sharing our resources

Our focus papers and fact sheets continue to be popular on social media. Over the past two months, we’ve promoted the following recent additions to the CIEP resource library.

 

Conference excitement

Also well-received was the super PDF of the #CIEP2020 conference session write-ups. At the end of April, we promoted this free booklet to our members, followers and friends via social media. We hope you enjoyed this conference recap, and that you’ll join us for more fabulous online learning at #CIEP2021!

In May, we used Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter to promote a competition offering ten free #CIEP2021 conference places. Then, in early June, we spun an online Wheel of Names to randomly select the winners. The response was phenomenal – thank you to the hundreds who entered, and congratulations to our lucky ten!

Those of you who are members of the Society of Young Publishers might also have attended SYP Scotland’s #SYPRefresh conference. The CIEP sponsored one of the sessions and offered delegates a free copy of the Your House Style guide.

Wordy chat

As ever, tips, talk and debate about words formed a large part of our social media output, from the language of painting and decorating to the origin of haggis, from the history of ‘gilding the lily’ to the differences between ‘lead’ and ‘led’, ‘unsatisfied’ and ‘dissatisfied’, ‘use to’ and ‘used to’. We also learned about five words that don’t mean what you think they do when you look into their origins.

One word we had certainly never heard before, because it’s brand new, is ‘boffice’. Can you guess what it is? You may even have one of your own. Give up? OK, here’s the link.

Quizzes and other fun stuff

The CIEP offers its own fun quizzes, but we love other people’s quizzes too. There was a good crop during this period, including puzzlers about US v UK English, how certain words were coined, libraries and book titles based on their obscure subtitles.

Talking of obscurity and book titles, how about The Adventures of a Pin, Supposed to be Related by Himself, Herself or Itself (someone there could do with the singular ‘they’), Ducks; and How to Make them Pay, Cabbages and Crime, and Who’s Who in Cocker Spaniels? You can find all these wonders and 73 more in ‘77 strange, funny and magnificent book titles you’ve probably never heard of’.

Those among us who are parents of young children laughed long and hard at the twisteddoodles cartoon that one genius social media team member chose for the late May Bank Holiday Friday Funny, entitled ‘If going anywhere with small children was a magical fantasy novel’. This inspired 123 reactions on Facebook, with particular admiration given to Chapter Six, ‘The Snackening’. The last chapter is ‘The Vow to Never Go Anywhere Again’, with the title of Book Two, the sequel, revealed as ‘The Forgotten Vow’. Talking of which, we’ll see you again at the end of the long UK summer holidays. Have a lovely sunny time, and don’t forget the snacks.

Don’t miss a thing in editing and proofreading. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

About the CIEP

The Chartered Institute of Editing and Proofreading (CIEP) is a non-profit body promoting excellence in English language editing. We set and demonstrate editorial standards, and we are a community, training hub and support network for editorial professionals – the people who work to make text accurate, clear and fit for purpose.

Find out more about:

 

Photo credits: notebooks by Kiy Turk on Unsplash.

Posted by Abi Saffrey, CIEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the CIEP.

CIEP social media round-up: February and March 2021

Ah, the relief in February and March 2021 as spring approached, and finally, well, sprang. We marked this hopeful period by promoting a new course and guide, and by celebrating significant days and seasons.

In this article, we cover:

  • Word for Practical Editing course
  • promotion of our Going Solo guide
  • BookMachine’s Editorial Season
  • Twitter threads, racism and the media
  • special days and seasons
  • business tips and tricks
  • language love.

Our three-month promotion of the Word for Practical Editing course had a fantastic response across social media, with nearly half a million impressions across our various platforms, and nearly 5,000 click-throughs to the course page. It clearly strikes a chord with budding and more experienced editors alike who want to maximise Microsoft Word’s ability to do the heavy lifting when it comes to routine editing tasks.

We hope you enjoyed watching Sue Littleford, author of our guide Going Solo, spin a wheel of names! The ten lucky winners each received a free copy of the second edition of this popular start-up guide.

Another popular event promoted heavily on social media was BookMachine’s Editorial Season. We ran a special membership-growth campaign, and Advanced Professional Member Kia Thomas featured in one of the Season’s regular Wednesday Wisdom slots. Kia shared her experience and insights into editorial freelancing during a live Q&A that was well attended and very much enjoyed.

We also used Twitter threads to promote Going Solo and a blog post about proofreading as a side hustle. Threading is a useful tool for Twitter promotion that requires more in-depth information than can be squeezed into 280 characters.

The CIEP was especially grateful for this functionality during the controversy that erupted following comments from the Society of Editors’ former executive director, Ian Murray, on racism and the media. Commenting on something as serious and important to our industry via social media needs to be concise and clear but substantive. Threading allowed us to make a statement about the CIEP’s commitment to conscious language, representation and structural barriers, and to continuing to learn and do better. You can find our commitment to anti-racism on the home page of our website.

Special days and seasons

During Covid times there has been a feeling of making the most of special days and other periods of celebration. As we’re wordy people, this usually involves reading the relevant books. February was LGBT+ History Month and we published three articles that explored some great LGBT+ reads: history books; books that celebrate and educate; and 42 LGBTQ books that will change the literary landscape this spring. To mark that special day in mid-February – you know, the one celebrated all over the world – that’s right, National Radio Day on 13 February (why, which mid-February date did you think we meant?) we included a much-admired poem from Brian Bilston re-creating the tuning of a radio. At the beginning of March it was World Book Day, of course, eagerly anticipated as the most popular ever. To celebrate St Patrick’s Day on 17 March we shared an article covering 25 books by Irish authors you should read.

On 8 March it was International Women’s Day, but the articles we posted celebrating women during these two months weren’t confined to a mere day. From women in the OED to a quiz to find out which literary heroine you are, and from what Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s time in lockdown teaches us to how well you know a selection of literary classics by women, quite apart from all of the articles we featured that were written by women, quoted women and built on the work of women – well, it was as if women and girls make up, what, 49.6% of the world’s population or something.

Business tips and tricks

As ever, we posted a good number of articles to help our friends and followers keep ahead in their businesses. The title of ‘Video killed the meeting room star’ was given a thumbs-up by our Facebook audience, but its contents proved equally admirable as it explored the do’s and don’ts of making video calls. Articles on pricing structures, being able to accept feedback and when and how to fire a freelance client offered useful advice, and posts condensing the lessons of decades of non-fiction editing experience and how to edit face to face, as well as a quiz on the anatomy of a book, were useful in a different way. For inspiration (and what business person doesn’t need to be inspired sometimes?) we posted a great article about seven writers who were also editors (and the books they edited), and another about the innovative influencers on TikTok whose book reviews are having a major effect on publishing sales.

Language love

But if you’re an editor or proofreader it’s no use being strong on the business side if you’re not cutting the mustard with your knowledge of language and punctuation. We covered this side of things too, with articles about prefixes, countable nouns, brackets and parentheses and commas between adjectives in creative writing.

And then there’s the content we post because of the sheer love of language, which we know our friends and followers share: ‘6 Latin abbreviations you should know’, ‘When repulsive wasn’t disgusting’, ‘Irony and the OED’ and an article on imps and elves, and what they have to do with vaccines. A wealth of etymology and history, all rounded off with a bang-up-to-date short article on whether it’s correct to say O.K., OK, ok or okay. The answer, apparently, is now ‘ok’, with a nod to the fact that ‘maybe mmmkay will achieve formal status one day’. ‘K’, as one of our Facebook followers succinctly said.

In February and March 2021 we showcased CIEP courses and guides, spoke out on important issues, and curated seasonal content and tips to improve your business and language skills. We hope you enjoyed following us as winter turned to spring.

Don’t miss a thing in editing and proofreading. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

About the CIEP

The Chartered Institute of Editing and Proofreading (CIEP) is a non-profit body promoting excellence in English language editing. We set and demonstrate editorial standards, and we are a community, training hub and support network for editorial professionals – the people who work to make text accurate, clear and fit for purpose.

Find out more about:

 

Photo credits: grass in sunlight by Aniket Bhattacharya; women by Claudio Schwarz | @purzlbaum, both on Unsplash.

Posted by Abi Saffrey, CIEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the CIEP.

CIEP social media round-up: December 2020 and January 2021

December and January were all about giveaways, grammar, goals and good dogs.

December saw the launch of our first holiday calendar campaign, which offered daily giveaways and time-limited discounts on CIEP fact sheets, focus papers, courses, guides, articles and conference-session videos. The promotion was a big hit within the global editing community and drew attention to the huge bank of valuable content offered by the CIEP.

In January, we began testing Facebook ads and commissioned a social media consultant with expertise in delivering these to targeted audiences. A three-month-long campaign featuring our Word for Practical Editing course will run until early April 2021.

We also reposted links to older but still relevant problem-solving CIEP blog posts about customer service, punctuation, word counts, multi-lingual editing, editing technical materials, plain English, editor websites, editing scams, being a young editor, business content, keeping fit and being a freelance introvert.

My grammar and your grammar, sitting by the fire

The CIEP has a new Getting to Grips with Grammar and Punctuation course, and during December and January grammar, punctuation and language usage featured prominently in our curated content, from an adverb quiz to whether it’s acceptable to say ‘try and’, the order of adjectives, the prefix un-, the word ‘multiple’, the dative pronoun ‘methinks’ and if it’s wrong to say ‘from whence’, as ‘whence’ means ‘from what place, source or cause’. This kicked off its own debate, as we suggested ‘this ever-changing world in which we live in’ was a similar example of superfluity in language and asked if anyone could name the song ‘from whence’ these lyrics came. A number of followers and friends suggested that the right words (from ‘Live and Let Die’) were ‘this ever-changing world in which we’re livin’’, which sent us down an internet rabbit hole via Stan Carey at the Macmillan Dictionary Blog to an interview with Sir Paul McCartney himself. After all that, it turns out Sir Paul wasn’t sure of the lyrics, either.

Goodbye 2020, hello 2021

As it was the end of one year and the beginning of the next, there was a certain amount of looking back and looking forward, plus a festive article on what you should read based on your favourite Quality Street. Well worth a read at any time of the year, although it might make you hungry. We celebrated 2020’s incredible book sales (an article that got 118 likes on Facebook, the equivalent of a hearty round of applause), concentrated on setting goals for 2021, were inspired by small professional editor groups, and looked to start our own editorial blogs.

What’s in a name?

Near the beginning of December we posted a story about a set of Isaac Newton’s notes, sold for auction at £378,000, that was almost destroyed by fire when his dog, Diamond, jumped up on the table and upset a candle. Obviously our first thought was ‘what an excellent name for a dog’. As is Smurf, the starring example of a CMOS article on commas and appositives. Should you write ‘your dog Smurf’ or ‘your dog, Smurf’? It depends on whether Smurf is your only dog; if so, use the comma. This set us thinking: if Smurf isn’t your only dog, what would your others be called? Moomin, Kermit and Simba, perhaps. And in fact, Simba featured in an article in Dictionary.com about where the world’s most popular pet names come from. But not everyone wants to go mainstream, and the beauty of pet naming is that you can use a word hardly anyone has heard of like, say, sporange (the botanical structure that creates spores), which is remarkable for being the only word in the English language that rhymes with orange. Pretty distinctive. Although yelling it across your local park might be more distinctiveness than you’d be comfortable with.


Don’t miss a thing in editing and proofreading. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.


Photo credits: silver reactions by George Pagan III on Unsplash

Posted by Abi Saffrey, CIEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the CIEP.

Buck the trend: strengthening your business during lockdown

By Rachel Gristwood

2020 was a challenging year in which to set up and run a business. But with the wonders of modern technology, it has been possible to receive training, find clients and function as an editor/proofreader from the comfort of our own homes.

In 2019, I completed the CIEP’s Proofreading 1: Introduction course and passed the Proofreading 2: Headway course. That summer, I began a year-long business start-up course through The Growing Club, a local Community Interest Company (CIC) for women that functions much like an enterprise agency. It provided me with training and support while I was setting up my business: Well Read Proofreading Services.

And then the pandemic struck.

There was no script for how to set up a business and find clients in a pandemic. The trick was to use the contacts I already had, think innovatively and make the most of every opportunity that came my way.

I’ve listed below some suggestions for how to strengthen a proofreading/editing business during the pandemic, together with how these avenues have helped me – sometimes in surprising ways.

Local Enterprise Agency (EA)

Local enterprise agencies exist in the UK to help start-up and small businesses. Other countries may have organisations that perform a similar function but go by a different name for our overseas friends.

  • Ask if they run training courses. These may be as simple as a morning session on how to use a particular social media platform, or an in-depth year-long course on how to set up and run a business. Enquire as to whether you might be eligible for any funding to help with costs.
  • See if they have any networking events via Zoom. You may be able to find new clients. At the very least, you’d be able to chat with other small business owners and perhaps learn from them.
  • Does your local EA have any contact with other organisations that may help you, such as the local group of the Federation of Small Businesses (FSB) or a Chamber of Commerce?
  • Is there a mentoring scheme where you can be helped with the finer details of running your business and finding clients?

My experience

I am fortunate to live in the area covered by The Growing Club, a Community Interest Company that provides support, training and mentoring opportunities for women in the North West of England. I began a year-long business start-up course in the summer of 2019, which continued via Zoom during the lockdown. Through that course, I now have a business mentor who will answer questions, help me to plan and, most importantly to me, help with any difficulties – something I am so grateful for as it greatly reduces my stress levels!

I attend a weekly Zoom drop-in session, which is great for socialising with other small business owners and finding out answers to any questions I might have. I also attend the monthly local group meeting of the FSB, through which I now have two prospective clients talking with me about their future proofreading needs.

I have gained some business through networking there, and now have two local authors as clients; two local businesses have given me material to proofread that they’ve written during lockdown, and the owner of a new start-up business asked me to bring their website up to scratch because English is their second language.

I’ve also undertaken a piece of copywriting through The Growing Club and had the pleasure of being taken on as a writing coach to help a local author with her writing – something I enjoyed enormously.

Local college

Colleges provide courses to help upskill their local population.

  • Find out about the range of courses they offer. You may have thought of broadening your social media reach to get your business ‘out there’, so see if your local college offers training courses on different social media platforms.
  • See if they run courses on aspects of running a business; for example, marketing or finance.
  • Ask if funding is available to local businesses.

My experience

I found there were social media courses through Lancaster and Morecambe College, with training provided by The Consult Centre, a local social media company. I undertook training sessions on LinkedIn, Facebook and Google My Business, as well as Canva, which enables me to design professional, branded posts to upload to my social media platforms. As a local business owner, I was eligible for full funding.

While I post weekly on social media to increase the visibility of my business, I’ve enjoyed the natural networking opportunities such interaction has given me. Connecting with other editors and proofreaders through LinkedIn has been a pleasure, a helpful resource, and has helped me feel much less isolated during these strange times.

Universities

Students and academics use the services of proofreaders for dissertations, theses, journal articles and books. Some universities maintain a register of approved proofreaders. They may stipulate that applicants to the register must live within easy reach of the university to meet potential clients in person, if requested, and there are often proofreader guidelines to adhere to.

My experience

I definitely knew when Masters dissertation writing time had arrived! Yes, you’re proofreading to a tight deadline, but I got a real buzz out of working closely with the students and helping make their writing the best it could be prior to submission.

I enjoyed a detailed commission for an academic to help ensure her article met the house style of the journal she wished to submit it to.

The Chartered Institute of Editing and Proofreading

My membership of the CIEP has played an integral part in my development as a proofreader. I completed the Institute’s level 1 and 2 proofreading courses in 2019.

The 2020 CIEP conference laid a wealth of information at my feet. Thank you to every keynote speaker. The networking sessions were instrumental in helping me build connections with editors and proofreaders.

I also belong to my local CIEP group and enjoy the Zoom meetings. It’s a great way to give tips to others and to learn from those more experienced than myself.

Other avenues

Be innovative!

Write articles for publications. This will get your business name out there and tell people what services you provide.

Diversify. I now also offer:

  • Copywriting
  • Transcription
  • Coaching sessions in writing skills.

For those of you just starting out, see if you can undertake voluntary work in return for a testimonial.

Summary

Be open to opportunities and flexible enough to mould your skills to a situation that may not be your normal remit, but one that you could diversify into.

The most memorable soundbite I learned from my year-long business start-up course was: ‘Don’t ever do the hard sell – just talk to people.’ Ask them about themselves and their business. Leave them with a positive feeling after your conversation and they’ll remember you in a good light.

I hope I’ve been able to suggest ideas to strengthen your business. I’d love to hear your tips, too.

After achieving a Masters in Volcanology and Geological Hazards from Lancaster University, Rachel Gristwood trained in proofreading through the CIEP before setting up her business, Well Read Proofreading Services. She enjoys working within academia, and also with local authors and business owners. Networking is important to her, especially via Zoom during the pandemic.

 


The CIEP’s guides are great resources for editorial business owners – whatever stage they are at. Check out Marketing Yourself and Pricing a Project. A new edition of Going Solo, with an accompanying record keeping Excel toolkit, will be published soon.


Photo credits: Rachel’s photo was taken by her late father, Ken Gristwood. Strength by Vicky Sim; Grow by Andrew Seaman on Unsplash.

Posted by Abi Saffrey, CIEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the CIEP.

CIEP social media round-up: October and November 2020

Well, we’ve been busy. In our last round-up, we described our first chatbot social media campaign, which featured Lynne Murphy’s focus paper on global Englishes. There was more chatbot fun on Facebook in late October when we delivered 350 copies of Rob Drummond’s focus paper The linguistic sophistication of swearing via Messenger. That was followed up by a cross-platform promotion that focused on grammar snafus. The Slaying zombie language ‘rules’ fact sheet and a spooky version of our ever-popular language quizzes were promoted just in time for Halloween.

The fun wasn’t all on Facebook, though. Next, we posted Meet the Directors videos on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook, revealing not just a few surprising facts about the Council!

November saw our first online conference. We hope you enjoyed the Facebook competition! Over 1,200 people entered, and five won free places picked randomly from an online Wheel of Names spun by the marketing and social media directors.

The CIEP blog is a valuable repository of content written by our members, and we want to celebrate that. Now that our new scheduling system is up and running, we’re able to ensure that our articles are broadcast via social media on a regular basis, regardless of when they’re written. Over the past two months, we’ve posted or reposted blogs about glossaries, the forums, language, business tips, grammar, the author–editor relationship, networking, project management, productivity, querying, references and imposter syndrome.

We’re also now scheduling weekly posts and videos about the directory. Each one features a genre, subject or service, and links to the directory. The goal? To show potential clients around the world how to find a qualified editorial professional who’s a great fit for them.

And finally, membership and training. Our courses, guides and membership benefits are also featuring every week on social media. Did you catch the video about the Efficient Editing course? We know how much people are missing face-to-face workshops so we’re spreading the word about the CIEP live webinars via the socials too.

Lost in translation

As usual, we brought our followers a rich selection of content from all over the internet about words in all their glory and variety. Popular were our postings of articles that explored words from different languages that just couldn’t be translated into one English word, yet described something exactly. On 10 November on Twitter and 13 November on Facebook, we shared 10 untranslatable words that perfectly describe how you’re feeling in 2020 – for example, all that boketto (staring blankly into space, Japanese) in your home might give you fernweh (a hunger to travel to faraway places, German). We complemented this on 11 November with 38 wonderful words with no English equivalent and topped them both off a couple of weeks later with a Merriam-Webster quiz asking where in the world certain English words originated from.

Dogs can definitely boketto

We also posted a piece this Halloween-tide about Edgar Allan Poe’s vocabulary, from ‘alarum’ to ‘tintinnabulation’ – a word, incidentally, that revealed the source of ‘tintinnabulum’, used in Part I of The Zombie That Ruled Grammar for Infinite Eternity, subject of Riffat Yusuf’s spine-chilling language column for the CIEP.

Ace ACES

ACES, the society for editing in America, was a veritable fount of knowledge, sharing its wisdom on editing-related matters from understanding image rights to public speaking to copyediting graphic novels. Especially fascinating was its piece on ablaut reduplication – not another untranslatable phrase, but the phenomenon that we all know but don’t know that we know, of vowels in constructions such as ‘ding-dong’ or ‘hee-haw’ moving from the front to the back of the mouth. This was discussed at the grammar amnesty session at our 2019 conference, with a prize (a KitKat – geddit?) offered for more examples. Published just after our 2020 online conference season, this article became a lovely reminder of when we were last together in person. Thanks, ACES.

Words of the year

In November, Collins Dictionary named its word of the year: lockdown. A fortnight later, Oxford Languages announced that, for them, it wasn’t possible to identify just one word of 2020, and they released a report, Words of an Unprecedented Year, instead. Perhaps it’s time to look somewhere completely different for words that inspire and delight. On 13 November on Twitter, we posted New York Magazine’s video of the vocabulary of Schitt’s Creek’s Moira Rose, whose speech fairly bombilates with unusual terms: something to confabulate about as you chin-wag on Zoom with family and friends over the next few weeks. We wish you a truly glee-ridden holiday season, dear social media followers.

Don’t miss a thing in editing and proofreading. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.


Photo credits: social media by Merakist; dog by Naomi Suzuki, both on Unsplash

Posted by Abi Saffrey, CIEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the CIEP.

Consistency is key to building and keeping a ‘fan base’

This year’s CIEP conference was held online, from 2 to 4 November. Attendees from all over the world logged on to learn and socialise with their fellow editors and proofreaders, and a number of delegates kindly volunteered to write up the sessions for us. Emily Gleeson reviewed Digital marketing primer: making a big splash on your own, presented by Erin Brenner.

Coffee break at the 2019 SfEP Conference.

In a year of firsts for everyone, the CIEP 2020 conference brought many for me – my first online conference, my first CIEP event and, more pressingly, my first time nervously writing something real that people might read. My nerves may have been wasted, though, as the more sessions I attended, the more I felt I’d found a place where I could just … be.

Stage fright is my most loyal companion and extends to everything that’s visible to the public, which certainly affects my weak digital marketing efforts. So, it was with a sliver of excitement and loads of trepidation that I sat down to watch Erin Brenner (Right Touch Editing) speak, hoping to learn even a little something that might help.

For many, digital marketing conjures up frightening images of the conceptually impossible, but Erin soothed us quickly. She began by breaking it down into easy-to-stomach pieces. In doing so, she changed my perspective on successful marketing from an insurmountable mountain scaled only by interpersonal geniuses, into relieved acceptance of the clearly doable step-by-step processes defined by her tidy methods. With a heavy emphasis on building strategy, we were introduced to a clear, goal-driven structure that I’m sure will have even the most introverted and uncertain of us seeing small triumphs, if only we put in the effort. In a defining point about audience, Erin tapped into a reminder I expect all of us need to hear occasionally.

The problem we’re solving for our client is not their lack of clean copy.

It’s so easy to get caught up in the achievement that we find in polishing something to almost perfect, that we can forget that our clients come to us to make their product better, not cleaner or well-written. If they understood our profession – our passion, obsession, sometimes pathological need – enough to know that cleaner even exists, much less as a step towards better, they’d probably not look for us at all.

This comment about problem-solving, which took up only a single line in my hurried notes and is something we’re probably all theoretically aware of, carried us easily into the remainder of the session. Empowering and encouraging in her easy, collegial way of sharing, Erin took us on something akin to a journey of marketing enlightenment. She broke down everything – from defining the real problem we’re solving to how to use a strong marketing message and evocative keywords to get that across. So genuinely generous is Erin with her expertise, we were also treated to resources and suggestions to help us successfully develop a schedule and measure the result of our efforts. All we have to do is stick to the plan.

Erin Brenner’s Digital Marketing Primer rather convincingly conveyed this exciting idea that, with a little bit of patience and the creation of fluid, achievable goals, digital marketing success is not out of reach for any of us. In fact, if we can keep the excuses at bay and follow the guidance we’ve been given, we can pursue it with confidence and clarity and strive to make our businesses work better for us.

Emily Gleeson is a fiction editor based in Australia, who proclaims an eclectic taste and a preference for stirring subtlety, bold truths and vivid imagery, but whose real delight comes from the happiness her clients find in their achievement. Emily can be found at facebook.com/emilygleesoneditorial/, where she patiently awaits news of a CIEP membership upgrade.

 


Posted by Abi Saffrey, CIEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the CIEP.

CIEP social media round-up: August and September 2020

In August we celebrated freelancing month by teaming up with BookMachine for combined social media posts, tips, interviews and resources about life as a freelancer, including useful blogs by CIEP member Julia Sandford-Cooke, ‘Six ways to be the freelance editor you want to be’, and Sam Kelly, ‘Getting started as a freelance proofreader’. BookMachine offered a CIEP discount on their membership fee and we offered free CIEP membership through the BookMachine website. Welcome to all the new members who joined us during this time!

Across all our social media platforms, we shared our collection of free fact sheets and focus papers, including Professor Lynne Murphy’s recent focus paper on Global English. On Facebook, we experimented with a chatbot engagement tool that delivered the paper directly via Messenger. If you’re a devotee of our other platforms, don’t worry – we’ll be trying new things on Twitter and LinkedIn soon! We reminded our new and not-so-new members about the content they could access as part of their membership, such as fact sheets about academic editing, editing efficiency in Word and getting your first clients, plus a handy editing jobs log. In August and September, too, we gave everyone the opportunity to take (or retake) our just-for-fun, often topical, CIEP quizzes 12, 3 and 4.

For those who became interested in the origins of the word ‘freelance’ in August, with all the talk of it, a handy history, supplied by Ye Olde Merriam-Webster, came a-riding to our rescue.

Text old, new and newer

Talking of history, there is always a proportion of our curated content that looks to texts past, from Thomas Cromwell’s cut-and-paste job, which added his image to the Bible of Henry VIII, to Agatha Christie’s best first lines, and from the world’s first novel to the debate about whether the work of female writers from the past, written under male pseudonyms, should now bear their real names (we posted articles that argued both for and against this idea).

Meanwhile, history was being made with the anticipation of, then the reporting on, the best first week of September for booksellers since records began. A delay to the publication of some titles due to lockdown, plus pre-Christmas releases, meant that on 3 September, ‘Super Thursday’, 600 titles hit the bookshops. Quite a few for the TBR (to be read) pile, although our social media audiences are well used to our discussion of this ever-growing fixture on most of our bedside tables.

We learned about some up-to-the-minute, freshly coined phrases such as ‘space marshal’ (someone whose job it is to enforce physical distancing), ‘crisis beard’ and ‘lockdown tache’ (well, you can guess the meaning of those). And thence to the most immediate type of text – actual texting, on a phone – with Macmillan Dictionary’s new listings of emojis and a report that young people can be intimidated by full stops in text messages, as they see them as a sign of anger. No doubt this discovery will send many older texters hurriedly back to Macmillan’s emojis to find appropriate graphics to use instead. (For, really, we can’t have *nothing* at the end of a text, can we?)

Even newer than all this was the idea of robots writing the text we read in the future. For a little shiver down your spine, read ‘A robot wrote this entire article. Are you scared yet, human?’

Useful tips

As ever, we scoured the internet for useful advice and tips for editors and proofreaders, from keyboard shortcuts for Word to how to write fight scenes, from editing recipes to using reference materials effectively. The winner, however, in terms of sheer, unmitigated first aid for anyone who edits or proofreads, was Adrienne Montgomerie’s blog, ‘Edit Faster! Triage for the Eight-minute Editor’, which linked to even more incredibly useful content. A treasure trove.

Tenuous links to animals

Our social media pages would not be ours if they didn’t have a generous sprinkling of animal references (real or, frankly, tenuous). We offered our readers variations on the famous Buffalo sentence (in case you’re wondering, it’s Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo), we brought them a history of the term ‘a load of old codswallop’ and Merriam-Webster’s readers’ pet peeves (OK, those two links *are* tenuous), but to crown the lot we posted a puppy, yes, a puppy, quiz. And then kicked ourselves for not having written one ourselves.

Down time

Not that you could ever be bored while following us on social media, but we posted a brief history of boredom, just in case our followers needed a reminder of what it felt like. Other lighter content included a selection of photos that illustrated the word ‘irony’, and, one of the most popular postings of August and September, an article in which an artist revealed the fonts used in some of the most recognisable logos (a surprising number of which were Helvetica). Finally, we shared the story of the anonymous New York Times typo-spotter (@nyttypos on Twitter), who is gaining a cult following, and in fact, proving quite helpful to the editors at the US newspaper. Not that we encourage typo-shaming of any sort, but on the other hand we love a mystery. After all, we’ve taken Penguin’s ‘Which famous detective are you?’ quiz, so we know we’re Miss Marple/John Rebus/Sherlock Holmes/Philip Marlowe/DCI John Luther/Hercule Poirot/Harry Hole/Jessica Fletcher …

Don’t miss a thing in editing and proofreading. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.


Photo credits:  Library by Giammarco Boscaro; Puppies by Jametlene Reskp, both on Unsplash

Posted by Abi Saffrey, CIEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the CIEP.

CIEP social media round-up: June and July 2020

In June and July the CIEP looked to create, as well as curate, our social media content.

A CIEP commitment to anti-racism

In June, the CIEP – like many other organisations – sought to respond meaningfully as we reached a tipping point globally: a point at which anti-racism demands more of us than lip service to dismantling structural inequality. On 5 June, we published A CIEP commitment to anti-racism across our social media channels, setting out five steps that the CIEP will take to contribute to change.

‘As editors and proofreaders,’ we noted, ‘there is so much that we can each do to make space for and amplify voices that have historically been and continue to be marginalised and silenced.’ A warm reaction on Facebook (87 likes/loves and 14 shares), Twitter (71 likes and 25 retweets) and LinkedIn (117 likes/loves/applause) demonstrated how keenly this resonates. Both privately and publicly, members expressed emotion at being part of a membership eager to take action; some followed up swiftly on this commitment, forming a working group to translate the CIEP’s words into practice.

Throughout June, the CIEP social media team curated relevant content, including Do the work: an anti-racist reading list, and promoted Black voices, spanning #PublishingPaidMe, a campaign asking authors to reveal their advances and expose race-based pay gaps, a call from the Black Writers’ Guild for sweeping changes in UK publishing and a celebration of Reni Eddo-Lodge’s success as the first Black British author to top the UK’s official book charts. We also shared Alex Kapitan, the Radical Copyeditor, explaining why saying ‘All Lives Matter’ makes things worse, not better, Sophie Playle’s thoughts about how to avoid unconscious bias in your creative writing, and a list of 5 steps freelance editors can take to combat racism. And these efforts continue, the CIEP’s social media being key to our commitment ‘to [seek] out and [amplify] BAME voices and the voices of editors/proofreaders of colour worldwide’.

All the free stuff

As we went into July we continued creating social media content by publicising a range of free-for-everyone and free-for-members fact sheets and focus papers across all our platforms, including a love letter to editing cunningly disguised as a focus paper by our honorary president, David Crystal, called ‘Imagine an editor’. This was popular with our audiences, but we also found that explainers, such as ‘Training for proofreading or copyediting’ and ‘The publishing workflow’, went down well too.

 

Of these, our fact sheet on ‘Proofreading or copyediting?’, which could be used to explain to clients the differences between the two disciplines, went down a storm. We also posted CIEP quizzes 1, 2 and 3 across our platforms, in case any of our audiences had missed them. These got a particularly good response on LinkedIn, with ‘pub quiz’ participants comparing scores and one follower commenting: ‘Fun and educational every time 😊’.

Never forgetting our bookshelves, or the location of the toilet

Pieces on bookshelves, how to organise them, and the books we put on them are always popular with our audiences. In June and July we offered articles (some from the archives) on a bookshelf illusion mural in Utrecht; a list of all the ways to organise your bookshelf, including using the Dewey Decimal System; organising books by colour only; (if more inspiration were needed) how 11 writers organise their personal libraries; and (if all else fails, presumably) the artistic arrangement of books around a person or persons in order to recreate a series of dramatic scenes.

We also took a virtual trip to a writer’s studio in a garden, which could just as easily have been an editor’s studio, we thought (or hoped). One Facebook follower asked: ‘Does it have a toilet? Not going in the bushes …’. Apparently it does, but it’s concealed behind a secret panel. Here’s hoping it’s easily found in moments of need.

Talking of virtual trips, our Facebook followers made the role of books in their lives very clear when, on 1 June, we posted a link to a story about how Covid-19 is forcing authors to change their novels in ways such as avoiding references to flying and including details such as temperature checks. ‘I want to read about a world that’s not burning and going down the drain. I read to escape, not to be reminded that I can’t leave the house’ posted one follower. Oops. Luckily, later in the month we had the opportunity to share an article listing ‘50 brilliant books to transport you this summer’, and then even later (in July) to introduce our audiences to a piece that reviewed novels as if they were travel destinations. The reviewer of Les Misérables, in ‘A misérables trip to Paris’, advises ‘If you’re going to visit Paris, don’t go during revolution, I’d say, or at least don’t bring the kids’. Wise words indeed.

Loving letters

Another thing guaranteed to transport you is a simple handwritten letter, and during lockdown people have been turning to this lo-tech but lovely form of communication. We shared a story about a Colombian library’s campaign to spread positivity through anonymous letters, and a New York Times piece (restricted access) reminding us of the value of letters in these email-soaked days: ‘I do trade big, juicy emails with some people in my life, but receiving them isn’t quite the same as slitting open a letter, taking it to a big chair and settling in for the 20 minutes it takes to devour it’. We were also reminded of the value of using letters in marketing, with a Throwback Thursday blog by Louise Harnby which urged us not to forget the old ways.

Time for fun

As ever, we made space on our social media platforms for fun items, such as Futuracha, the font that changes as you type. And for anyone who has trouble remembering the difference between ‘born’ and ‘borne’, and ‘affect’ and ‘effect’, we posted the clever homophone artwork of Bruce Worden of Homophones, Weakly. Finally, ‘Words we know because of Star Trek’ went down well. So, until the next social media round-up, we send you this sincere wish: live long and prosper, friends.

Don’t miss a thing in editing and proofreading. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.


Photo credits: letter and coffee – Freddy Castro on Unsplash

Proofread and posted by Abi Saffrey, CIEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the CIEP.

CIEP social media round-up: April and May 2020

Two of the strangest months in memory, recorded through our social media accounts

Times such as these are tricky for a social media team whose focus is on publishing and freelancing. As with pretty much everything right now, long term we don’t know what COVID-19 might mean for publishing, the book industry, or editors and proofreaders. We entered April 2020 wondering what we could communicate to our audiences on a day-to-day basis. Too much doom would be unhelpful. Too much levity would be unwelcome. What to do? Like so many others, we took each day at a time.

Silver linings

But heartening developments emerged, at least where publishing was concerned: increased book buying during lockdown, and the appearance of online book festivals and other events, with the Hay Festival, from 18 to 31 May, presenting an impressive array of personalities including our own honorary president, David Crystal. (David also starred in Mark Allen’s new podcast, That Word Chat, on 11 May.) Online events, by their nature, could include many more people than would have attended physically. ACES, the society for editing in the US (@copyeditors), took its conference online with #ACES2020Online on 1 May, and we were promised great things by SENSE, the Society of English-language professionals in the Netherlands (@SENSEtheSociety), whose online conference was to take place in early June.

Revising our lexicon

We covered the updating of dictionaries that the coming of COVID-19 required, so that editors and proofreaders were informed about how to refer to the virus. We posted articles about new terms such as quarantini and coronacoaster, and terms that were gaining popularity such as infodemic, as well as whether we were using older terms differently now. We reminded our followers of the differences between similar terms we were now using a lot, such as hoard and horde (‘There are hordes of people hoarding toilet paper’, one Facebook follower observed).

Keeping up with tech

Video conferencing packages are now part of our lives in a way they never were before. We covered Zoom in various ways, from why Zoom makes you tired to sports commentator Andrew Cotter’s Zoom meeting with his two Labradors: a treat. Meanwhile, Cambridge Dictionaries introduced us to new video conferencing terms like zoombombing, zumping and teletherapy. Merriam-Webster noted the coining of two news-and-phone-related phrases: doomsurfing and doomscrolling.

Shelf isolation

More attention is being paid to bookshelves in these Zoom days (see ‘Bookcase Credibility’, @BCredibility, an account launched in April that comments on the bookshelves of various public figures). Of course, at CIEP we appreciate a good bookshelf (and a good book nook, a scene or figure that can be placed between shelved books). On 25 March we had proved ourselves ahead of the curve by asking our Twitter followers to #ShowUsYourShelves. To fill these shelves still further, during April and May there were a number of articles and postings about the books we could read in lockdown, to comfort us, return us to our childhoods, inspire, uplift or offer us escape, or simply to get us through. We enjoyed artist Phil Shaw’s ordering of books to tell a story with their titles, something that Orkney Library (@OrkneyLibrary), now temporarily closed, had often done for its 70K followers. And, remaining with libraries, the true story about the cleaner who rearranged the books in a library in size order – oh, horror! – inspired sympathy and hilarity in many.

Actors available

Suddenly, actors and other artists had time on their hands and were doing impromptu readings and recitals. Jennifer Ehle, Elizabeth Bennet in the famous BBC 1995 adaptation of Pride and Prejudice, read the novel chapter by chapter, and we shared this on Twitter on 6 April. Andy Serkis read The Hobbit online for charity. @SirPatStew (Sir Patrick Stewart) read a Shakespeare sonnet every day until 22 May. Our post announcing this got 83 likes and 33 shares from our delighted Facebook followers.

Home comforts

Of course, we editors and proofreaders are, for the most part, well used to all aspects of working from home, from furry assistants to endless tea or coffee drinking. And, alas, with beverages occasionally comes spillage. One of our most popular posts on Twitter was about an artist who made coffee stains into illustrations of monsters. There were a lot of them. Boy, was he unlucky with his coffee.

Funnies, Friday or otherwise

If you’re a devotee of the CIEP Facebook page, you’ll know that there’s a Friday Funny at about 4pm every week to send everyone off into the weekend with a smile. These are often comic strips by book-appreciating illustrators such as John Atkinson or authors who understand the trials of working from home such as Adrienne Hedger. When we’re very lucky, the legendary Brian Bilston releases a poem. His ‘Comparative Guidance for Social Distancing’ got 160 likes and 105 shares on our Facebook page, and it wasn’t even posted on a Friday. Sometimes the stars align and there’s a cat-and-books story we can post at the end of the week. Such an event took place on 22 May, when we enjoyed Horatio, a cat who wears (or, really, bears) costumes to promote his local library. As one Facebook user commented, ‘That is a patient cat.’ Truth.

Lockdown LinkedIn

We only started posting our blog-based LinkedIn content regularly last June, and since we passed the 10,000 followers mark last August our followers have increased again by another 8,000. Since lockdown, engagement has reduced as many of our followers seem to be working parents who are grabbing opportunities to work while suddenly morphing into teacher mode. During April and May 2020, posts that proved popular included: Denise Cowle’s week in the life of an editor (more than 8% engagement rate and 45 likes), a post by Intermediate Member Hilary McGrath sharing tips for staying motivated when starting a course (more than 4% engagement rate and 38 likes) and, showing reading-related content is our bread and butter, Abi Saffrey’s post about evaluating her year in books (more than 5% engagement rate, 32 likes and 8 comments).

Rounding up the round-up

During April and May 2020 on the CIEP’s social media, the emphasis was on editors and proofreaders looking after themselves, diverting themselves, keeping informed and looking for light where it could be found. As ever, our social media was overwhelmingly about support. We got a new emoji on Facebook – ‘care’, the usual little yellow head hugging a heart. Gotta tell you, it’s coming in useful.

Don’t miss a thing in editing and proofreading. Follow us on: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.


Photo credits: wall emojis by George Pagan III; cat by Andrii Ganzevych, both on Unsplash

Proofread by Victoria Hunt, Intermediate Member.
Posted by Abi Saffrey, CIEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the CIEP.

Are you up for the challenge?

By Alison Gilbert

LinkedIn challenges are fun and interactive, and I use them to engage with my target audience. My background is in education, and I have spent years engaging with parents and getting them involved with their children’s learning. The best way I found was with a challenge – something they could do together with their child. So I adapted the same principle to my proofreading business.

Setting a challenge

To set a challenge, you need to know your audience. Who are you trying to engage with? What sort of challenge would they want to get involved in? Then make it relevant and topical. Keep up to date with recent hot topics, relevant to your line of business. People get more engaged if there is a reason or a discussion point, such as in my reading challenge.

I strongly believe that children should read every day, so I set the challenge for parents to read with their children every night for a week and at the end of the challenge share their child’s favourite story. My post was topical and people got involved and shared their love of stories. It appealed to authors, publishers and fellow proofreaders. It was my most successful post and trended on LinkedIn, receiving more than 1,000 views.

Challenges can also reflect national events and times of the year. During National Storytelling Week I set a storytelling challenge to create a story together. This appealed to my audience of authors and let them showcase their writing. However, this post was less successful. I was hoping to generate a complete story over the week. The first day went really well and I chose the start to the story. But unfortunately no one commented to complete the next part of the story. I tried posting it on different days, times and with different images – even the author of the start of the story re-shared it – but still no takers. People like the initial idea of a challenge, but maybe I was overoptimistic in attempting to build on my challenge every day. Possibly it was too time-consuming a task; so since then I’ve tried to keep each challenge manageable and easy to fit in with people’s daily lives.

On the Random Acts of Kindness Day I set a challenge to do an act of kindness. I felt it was a great opportunity to encourage people to think of others and to go above and beyond.

When creating a challenge, image choice is very important in attracting your audience to the post. I have found bold images have worked for me, and I type a clear message on top of them. Therefore, people don’t have to scroll through my text to see what my challenge is all about. I think of them as an advert containing all the basic information necessary to promote engagement.

For a bit of fun at Christmas, I set a Christmas homework challenge, to get everyone in the mood for a magical time. Life needs to be filled with moments of fun!

The Comms Creatives challenge

I love challenges so much that I undertook another company’s challenge. The 31 Days of Creativity Challenge was set up by Comms Creatives, a marketing company that runs courses to inspire creativity. Every day for the month of January, Helen Reynolds, the owner, sent me an email with a creative challenge to post on social media. I used the challenge to learn new skills, stretch myself and advertise my proofreading business.

The challenges included some outright fun and silly ones to get my creative brain in gear: creating words using spaghetti, making a picture with your meal (I created the Hungry Caterpillar using grapes and cucumbers), creating origami, choosing an uplifting song, inventing a sandwich for your hero (mine is Joey from Friends, who loves sandwiches) and writing your day in emojis. Some challenges were quizzes to find out your creative personality and what drives you. Turns out that I am a producer.

Quite a few of the challenges were to get participants thinking and talking about their inspirations. For example, creating a video about what advice you would give yourself if you could go back in time (mine were believe in yourself, everything happens for a reason and trust your instincts), writing about what inspires you, visualising your style and sharing what you believe in (I believe in a love of learning).

Part of the challenge really tested my creativity and put me out of my comfort zone, for example writing a limerick (see the image above for mine), drawing tasks (I hadn’t drawn since school), creating videos, creating a story using a plot generator, writing a poem using magnetic letters, creating a handwritten message, creating a calligram (I did a snowflake using words linked to proofreading) and creating a newspaper article using a generator.

Some of the challenges were about reminiscing about my life and these seemed the most popular of my social posts – I created a collage of photos of my life and did something from my childhood. My most successful post during the challenge was a video clip of the game ‘Mousetrap’, which trended on LinkedIn. People obviously like reminiscing about their lives too and seeing connections with others.

I really enjoyed completing the 31 Days of Creativity Challenge: I gained confidence to post regularly on social media. I learned new skills, such as how to create videos and newspaper articles, and stretched myself to be more creative. I made a lot of connections during the challenge with other people doing the challenge at the same time. It was great each day to see how everyone had undertaken the challenge and to comment on their progress. Comms Creatives regularly run the challenges and do some on other platforms too.

Why do the challenges?

Challenges are motivating to others and encourage interaction. They allow me to engage with my target audience by tuning in to what is important to them, relevant and purposeful. Hopefully, building relationships through engagement will lead to future work connections. The challenges stand out on social media as being different and fun, and people always like a challenge. They are a good way to test yourself, find out what you are capable of and learn new skills.

Have a go: I challenge you to set a challenge for your target audience. Are you up for the challenge?

Alison Gilbert is a freelance proofreader, qualified teacher and early years professional with a love of learning. She specialises in educational and mathematical proofreading. She is an Entry-Level Member of the CIEP based in Ramsbottom, Lancashire.

 


Follow the CIEP on LinkedIn! (And Facebook. And Twitter.)


Proofread by Victoria Hunt, Intermediate Member.
Posted by Abi Saffrey, CIEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the CIEP.